Efficiency and Yield

Indicator Definition

Efficiency is expressed as the unit of input required to produce a unit of output and yield is the total product generated per unit of time or space. Both concepts address waste as a negative characteristic and drive toward improved profitability.

Why is this indicator important to the retail and food service sector?

The beef value chain has a responsibility to minimize waste and ensure as much protein reaches its destination and feeds people rather than being diverted to another end use or landfill.

Metrics

Level 1 − Has the company assessed food waste in its own operations?

Level 2 − Does the company have programs focused on reducing food waste in its operations, including beef waste? Does the company have policies that encourage adoption of U.S. Beef Industry Sustainability Framework metrics and enable suppliers to find alternative uses for safe, wholesome, surplus products (beef, in particular)?

Level 3 − Does the company set targets and track performance of its food waste reduction programs, including beef? Does the company engage its direct suppliers and track performance on food waste reduction in its beef supply chain?

Why did we choose these metrics?

Given the diversity of operations within the retail and food service sector, it is important to collaborate on solutions and recommendations being developed to continually improve on reducing food waste and improve efficiency and yield.

Desired Outcomes

By focusing on reducing food waste, many positive outcomes may be achieved including:

  • Overall, an improved understanding of the opportunity for reduction or diversion from landfill may be achieved
  • The ability to address food waste opportunities specific to the retail and food service operation may be attained
  • Implementation of policies to encourage similar practices in the operation’s value chain community, particularly around preventing beef waste

Why do these outcomes matter?

The continued reduction of food waste has lasting impacts on various indicators of the beef value chain. Approximately 41.2 million Americans live in food insecure households, up to one-fifth of cropland, fertilizer, and water used for agriculture is wasted to grow food that is never eaten, and as the number one contributor to landfills (by weight), wasted food accounts for 2.6 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

Success Criteria

1. Increased number of companies that have assessed food waste in its own operations

2. Development of programs focused on reducing food waste

3. Engagement of suppliers and encouraged adoption of the U.S. Beef Industry Sustainability Framework metrics in the supply chain

4. Setting of targets and tracking of performance of food waste reduction programs

How does this metric continuously improve beef sustainability?

Given the diversity of operations within our sector, it is important for our sector to collaborate on solutions and recommendations being developed to ensure they accurately reflect the realities of our operations and position efforts for success.

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